iiyama G-Master GB3467WQSU-B1 Red Eagle Review – Ultrawide for Gamers with VA Matrix, 165Hz Refresh and HDR

iiyama is a Japanese company specializing in computer monitors and professional displays, which has been on the market since 1973. Consumers appreciate their offers for good value for money and possibilities. A few months ago we announced the upcoming debut of a new model, this time using an ultrawide screen. I’m talking about the iiyama G-Master GB3467WQSU-B1 Red Eagle monitor. Unlike many of the brand’s other monitors, iiyama has opted for a heavily curved VA screen this time around. It offers high resolution and high refresh rate, while being characterized by low response time. On paper, the monitor seems very comprehensive in terms of specifications, so let’s see if the real tests confirm the positive tone of the dry documentation.

Author: Damian Marusiak

The iiyama G-Master GB3467WQSU-B1 Red Eagle monitor uses a 34-inch VA matrix with a resolution of 3440 x 1440. We are therefore dealing with an ultra-wide monitor, in addition quite strongly curved (which for a VA screen can be very useful in the context, for example, of improving the vision of angles). The maximum luminance is 550 nits, while the static contrast is 3000:1. There is also a high refresh rate of 165 Hz (only on the DisplayPort cable) and an MPRT response time of 0.4 ms. The monitor has a distinctive classic design, very similar to what we’ve seen before in smaller Red Eagle models. The monitor has been tested by us for many weeks, but we wanted to post our review closer to the in-store debut – that will be in May. It is therefore time to take stock of this useful life.

The iiyama G-Master GB3467WQSU-B1 Red Eagle monitor is a new proposal in the offer of the Japanese company. This time, a monitor with a 34-inch screen with a resolution of 3440 x 1440 pixels and a refresh rate of 165 Hz has been prepared for gamers. The bending radius of the equipment reaches 1500R.

iiyama G-Master GB3467WQSU-B1 Red Eagle Review - Ultrawide for Gamers with VA Matrix, 165Hz Refresh and HDR [nc1]

In terms of technology and quality, the VA matrix of the iiyama G-Master GB3467WQSU-B1 Red Eagle monitor is located between the IPS and TN panels. In this case, the liquid crystals are arranged both perpendicularly and obliquely with respect to the surface of the panel. Such an arrangement of the crystals makes the viewing angles wider compared to the Twisted Nematic. Additionally, the array response time is lower than most IPS arrays, but slightly faster than the TN. It is therefore a solution that tries to find a happy medium and tries to use the most important advantages of the IPS and TN technologies mentioned before.

iiyama G-Master GB3467WQSU-B1 Red Eagle Monitor Specifications
Matrix type VA (vertical alignment)
Screen diagonal 34 inches
Screen resolution 3440×1440 pixels
Spot size 0.232mm
Refresh Technology AMD FreeSync Premium:
48-165Hz for DP 1.4
48-100Hz for HDMI 2.0
Screen refresh rate 165Hz (DisplayPort 1.4)
100Hz (HDMI 2.0)
Curvature 1500R
The depth of color 8 bit (16.7 million color shades)
Matrix response time 0.4ms MPRT
Static contrast 3000:1
Maximum brightness 550 rivets
HDR Display VESAHDR 400 (HDR10)
Matrix type Matte screen
sRGB color space coverage ~99%
Available digital connectors 2x DisplayPort 1.4
2xHDMI 2.0
Other connectors 1x 3.5mm audio jack
USB 3.0 HUB (x4)
Speakers 2W (x2)
Weight (with stand) 8.7kg
Pivot
Guarantee 36 months door-to-door

iiyama G-Master GB3467WQSU-B1 Red Eagle Review - Ultrawide for Gamers with VA Matrix, 165Hz Refresh and HDR [nc1]

In the iiyama G-Master GB3467WQSU-B1 Red Eagle monitor test, we focus on some of the most important aspects from the point of view of daily use. So let’s take a close look at the build quality and usability of the OSD menu. There will be a color check of sRGB, Adobe RGB and DCI-P3 color spaces with an indication of errors in color representation. We will also check for backlight uniformity, luminance across multiple scenarios, and for backlight bleed. There will also be a discussion of viewing angles, input lag, smearing, and power consumption.

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